LOVE MEEEEEEEEE
Home
© 2010.Theme Still Here by I am 7th. Tumblr
someday the squirrels will take over.
About Me
Hi, I'm Damien. I'm just another trans guy. I'm also friendly so stop by and say hi.

free counters

Hello from Folsom.

Hello from Folsom.


My hand is freakishly claw-like.

My hand is freakishly claw-like.


There aren’t even words for how incredible my life is lately. I’ll try to remember to update when I’m not tired and drunk.


hochutuda:

Glacial_by_JayDaley

hochutuda:

Glacial_by_JayDaley


Reblogged from davidaedwards (Originally from wish-to-be-there)
Source: wish-to-be-there
preppybiologist:

rhamphotheca:

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction
by Elizabeth Palermo
Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.
A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…
(read more: Live Science)
photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

I met one of the few arapaima researchers last year (Dr. Don Stewart from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry). He’s a cool guy: he loves these fish and he hates the declines that he’s witnessed. He just wants people to understand why they’re important and why conservation matters. Plus, he does some awesome citizen science by getting the natives involved!

preppybiologist:

rhamphotheca:

Amazon’s Biggest Fish Faces Threat of Extinction

by Elizabeth Palermo

Measuring 10 ft (3 m) long and weighing in at more than 400 lbs (180 kg), it’s hard to imagine that the arapaima, the largest fish in the Amazon River basin, could ever go missing. But these huge fish are quickly disappearing from Brazilian waterways, according to a new study.

A recent survey of fishing communities in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, found that the arapaima is already extinct in some parts of the Amazon basin. In other parts of the Amazon, its numbers are rapidly dwindling…

(read more: Live Science)

photo by Sergio Ricardo de Oliveira

I met one of the few arapaima researchers last year (Dr. Don Stewart from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry). He’s a cool guy: he loves these fish and he hates the declines that he’s witnessed. He just wants people to understand why they’re important and why conservation matters. Plus, he does some awesome citizen science by getting the natives involved!


Reblogged from scienceyoucanlove (Originally from rhamphotheca)
Source: rhamphotheca

Reblogged from davidaedwards (Originally from gratefvl)
Source: gratefvl
sublim-ature:

Blyde River Canyon, South AfricaHougaard Malan

sublim-ature:

Blyde River Canyon, South Africa
Hougaard Malan


Reblogged from davidaedwards (Originally from sublim-ature)
Source: 500px.com

rockees:

a ferocious beast


Reblogged from therodentqueen (Originally from rockees)
Source: rockees

'My name is Robert but I would prefer that you call me Bob.' It's just like that. You know what I mean? And if you were to insist upon calling that person Robert, you would be a colossal dick.

Paul F. Tompkins, succinctly explaining why you call people what they want to be called, whether it’s “little people” or “transgender” or “chairperson” or “Bob”. It’s not about being politically correct and it’s not about you. It’s about basic decency and respect. (via ericmortensen)

As my father says regarding preferred descriptions and pronouns “that’s not ‘political correctness’, that’s basic etiquette.”

(via spyderqueen)


Reblogged from j-a-s-m-i-n-e-k-a (Originally from ericmortensen)
Source: ericmortensen

abbyjean:

Thomas Herbrich’s smoke plume photos. (This Is Colossal)


Reblogged from abbyjean